Calgary Hotel Deals List – Alberta, Canada

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Calgary (/ˈkælɡri/ (About this soundlisten)) is a city in the Canadian province of Alberta. It is situated at the confluence of the Bow Riverand the Elbow River in the south of the province, in an area of foothills and prairie, about 80 km (50 mi) east of the front ranges of the Canadian Rockies. The city anchors the south end of the Statistics Canada-defined urban area, the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor.[13]

The city had a population of 1,267,344 in 2018,[14] making it Alberta’s largest city and Canada’s third-largest municipality.[7] Also in 2016, Calgary had a metropolitan population of 1,392,609, making it the fourth-largest census metropolitan area (CMA) in Canada.[9]

The economy of Calgary includes activity in the energy, financial services, film and television, transportation and logistics, technology, manufacturing, aerospace, health and wellness, retail, and tourism sectors.[15] The Calgary CMA is home to the second-highest number of corporate head offices in Canada among the country’s 800 largest corporations.[16] In 2015, Calgary had the highest number of millionaires per capita of any major city in Canada.[17] In 1988, Calgary became the first Canadian city to host the Winter Olympic Games.

Calgary has consistently been recognized for its high quality of life. In 2018, The Economist magazine ranked Calgary the fourth-most liveable city in the world in their Global Liveability Ranking.[18] Calgary is classed as a Beta global cityby the Globalization and World Cities Research Network.

Early history[edit]

The Calgary area was inhabited by pre-Clovis people whose presence has been traced back at least 11,000 years.[32]The area has been inhabited by the Niitsitapi (Blackfoot ConfederacySiksikaKainaiPiikani), îyârhe Nakoda, the Tsuut’ina First Nations peoples and Métis Nation, Region 3. As Mayor Naheed Nenshi (A’paistootsiipsii; Iitiya) describes, “There have always been people here. In Biblical times there were people here. For generations beyond number, people have come here to this land, drawn here by the water. They come here to hunt and fish; to trade; to live; to love; to have great victories; to taste bitter disappointment; but above all to engage in that very human act of building community.”[33]

In 1787, cartographer David Thompson spent the winter with a band of Peigan encamped along the Bow River. He was a Hudson’s Bay Company trader and the first recorded European to visit the area. John Glenn was the first documented European settler in the Calgary area, in 1873.[34]

In 1875, the North-West Mounted Police erected Fort Calgary in an effort to police the area.

In 1875, the site became a post of the North-West Mounted Police (now the Royal Canadian Mounted Police or RCMP). The NWMP detachment was assigned to protect the western plains from US whisky traders, and to protect the fur trade. Originally named Fort Brisebois, after NWMP officer Éphrem-A. Brisebois, it was renamed Fort Calgary in 1876 by Colonel James Macleod.

When the Canadian Pacific Railway reached the area in 1883, and a rail station was constructed, Calgary began to grow into an important commercial and agricultural centre. Over a century later, the Canadian Pacific Railway headquarters moved to Calgary from Montreal in 1996.[35] Calgary was officially incorporated as a town in 1884, and elected its first mayor, George Murdoch. In 1894, it was incorporated as “The City of Calgary” in what was then the North-West Territories.[36] The Calgary Police Service was established in 1885 and assumed municipal, local duties from the NWMP.[37]

The Calgary Fire of 1886 occurred on November 7, 1886. Fourteen buildings were destroyed with losses estimated at $103,200. Although no one was killed or injured,[38] city officials drafted a law requiring all large downtown buildings to be built with Paskapoo sandstone, to prevent this from happening again.[39]

After the arrival of the railway, the Dominion Government started leasing grazing land at minimal cost (up to 100,000 acres (400 km2) for one cent per acre per year). As a result of this policy, large ranching operations were established in the outlying country near Calgary. Already a transportation and distribution hub, Calgary quickly became the centre of Canada’s cattle marketing and meatpacking industries.[citation needed]

By the late 19th century, the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) expanded into the interior and established posts along rivers that later developed into the modern cities of Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. In 1884, the HBC established a sales shop in Calgary. The HBC also built the first of the grand “original six” department stores in Calgary in 1913, the others that followed are Edmonton, VancouverVictoriaSaskatoon, and Winnipeg.[40][41]

Modern history (1900–present)[edit]

Rounding up cattle for the first Calgary Stampede in 1912. The Stampede is one of the world’s largest rodeos.

Between 1896 and 1914 settlers from all over the world poured into the area in response to the offer of free “homestead” land.[42] Agriculture and ranching became key components of the local economy, shaping the future of Calgary for years to come.[citation needed] The world-famous Calgary Stampede, still held annually in July, was started by four wealthy ranchers as a small agricultural show in 1912.[43] It is now known as the “greatest outdoor show on earth”.[44]

Calgary experienced Alberta’s first oil boom when Calgary Petroleum Products Co found oil just southwest of the city at Turner Valley in 1914. Western Canada’s first commercial oilfield boomed again in 1924 and 1936 and by WWII the Turner Valley oilfield was producing more than 95 per cent of the oil in Canada. As a result, major oil companies searched elsewhere in Alberta and in 1947 Imperial Oil discovered new reserves near Leduc, south of Edmonton. But Calgary was already the centre of Alberta oil and the new discovery caused the city to boom again. Calgary’s economy grew when oil prices increased with the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The population increased by 272,000 in the eighteen years between 1971 (403,000) and 1989 (675,000) and another 345,000 in the next eighteen years (to 1,020,000 in 2007). During these boom years, skyscrapers were constructed and the relatively low-rise downtown quickly became dense with tall buildings.[45]

Calgary’s economy was so closely tied to the oil industry that the city’s boom peaked with the average annual price of oil in 1981.[46] The subsequent drops in oil prices were cited by industry as reasons for a collapse in the oil industry and consequently the overall Calgary economy. Low oil prices prevented a full recovery until the 1990s.[47]

From 1971, the population of Calgary rose significantly, with many high-rises constructed to accommodate the growth.

With the energy sector employing a huge number of Calgarians, the fallout from the economic slump of the early 1980s was significant, and the unemployment rate soared.[48] By the end of the decade, however, the economy was in recovery. Calgary quickly realized that it could not afford to put so much emphasis on oil and gas, and the city has since become much more diverse, both economically and culturally. The period during this recession marked Calgary’s transition from a mid-sized and relatively nondescript prairie city into a thriving Canadian working centre. This transition culminated in the city hosting Canada’s first Winter Olympics in 1988.[49] The success of these Games[50] essentially put the city on the world stage.

Thanks in part to escalating oil prices, the economy in Calgary and Alberta was booming until the end of 2009, and the region of nearly 1.1 million people was home to the fastest growing economy in the country.[51] While the oil and gas industry comprise an important part of the economy, the city has invested a great deal into other areas such as tourism and high-tech manufacturing. Over 3.1 million people now visit the city annually[52] for its many festivals and attractions, especially the Calgary Stampede. The nearby mountain resort towns of BanffLake Louise, and Canmore are also becoming increasingly popular with tourists, and are bringing people into Calgary as a result. Other modern industries include light manufacturing, high-tech, film, e-commerce, transportation, and services.

Widespread flooding throughout southern Alberta, including on the Bow and Elbow rivers, forced the evacuation of over 75,000 city residents on June 21, 2013, and left large areas of the city, including downtown, without power.[53][54]

source
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calgary

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